Thursday, 28 July 2022

How to Report Against a Timeline

 

This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.


DO THIS

Control the perception of your reporting status. 


BY DOING THIS

–  Share your status beyond the reporting status meetings.

–  Provide evidence of progress for credibility.

–  Communicate action plans to close any gaps.


Proactive reporting will save you many stress-filled hours and gain you leader and team member confidence should you miss a deadline or outcome. The goal is to communicate constantly about whether you’re on or behind the plan. People can handle the truth but hate surprises; be the first to update stakeholders on your progress. 

First, you need to know your true status. Inaccurate reporting destroys credibility and raises concerns about your capabilities. A false update is most damaging when someone on the project team has better or more reliable data—information that contradicts your own stated accounts. 

If you’re on track, present evidence; if you’re behind, be clear on the gap and how you’ll fill it. Noting the activities already in play is an effective way to lower tensions and shift the focus from the problem to its solution.


KNOWLEDGE BITES



GAP CLOSURE ACTION PLAN TOOL: What is my plan to get back on track?


SUCCESS TIP

Being clear on how and when you’ll update leaders on progress helps build confidence in your capability to get back on track because it gives them something concrete to test.

For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the Reporting Against a Timeline podcast episode with executive and change leader Jennifer Rhodes.

Phil Buckley is the author of Change on the Run and  Change with Confidence, host of the  Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the  Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #timlines t #podcasts 

Thursday, 7 July 2022

How to Define Change Support

 

This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.


DO THIS

Ask people what they need.


BY DOING THIS

–  Review and align on the impacts of the change.

–  Ask people to select types of support from a master list.

–  Incorporate feedback into the change plan.


It's a fine balance between too much and too little change assistance. If you provide too much, people get stressed and may choose to opt out of activities; if you provide too little, people won't have the required mindsets, actions and behaviours to adopt the change.

Support activities need to accommodate people's realities. They must fit their needs and be easy to digest. The best and fastest way to select change enablement methods is to ask the people who are adopting the change what they need. They’re experts on current ways of working and will have a sense of what capabilities they need to adopt and challenges to overcome. 

Review the impacts of the change with representatives of those adopting the change. Provide a list of support options – skill training, coaching, job aids, simulations, etc. – and ask them to choose the ones they need. These inputs will help create a pragmatic and effective support plan to transition people to new ways of working.


KNOWLEDGE BITES



CHANGE SUPPORT WORKSHOP: What learning methods will best prepare people to adopt change?

SET UP (5 min.):

–  State the objective of identifying change support that meets people's needs and preferences.

–  Discuss the main impacts of the change and what people must think, do and behave to adopt the new ways of working.

ACTIVITY (20 min.):

–  Present a master list of learning options.

–  Ask people to choose the ones that would help them.

DEBRIEF (20 - 30 min.): 

–  Ask people to share why they choose their options.

–  Test for agreement among group members.

ACTIVITY (15 min.):

–  Ask the group to select the support options they believe would best meet the organization's needs.

CLOSE (5 min.):

–  Thank the group members for their participation, and state that their guidance is an important input into creating the change support plan.


SUCCESS TIP

Including the contributors' names in the change plan highlights and rewards their participation in making the change a success.


For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the Defining Change Support podcast episode with executive and change leader Stephen Sotto.

Phil Buckley is the author of Change on the Run and  Change with Confidence, host of the  Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the  Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #changesupport #podcasts 

Monday, 20 June 2022

How to Overcome a Blocker

 

This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.

DO THIS

Align your work with their agenda.


BY DOING THIS

–        Ask them to clarify their issue or concern.

–       Demonstrate how your work will help them.

–       Adjust your approach to accommodate their comments.


Blockers are people who raise barriers to your success. They either don’t want something done or they want it done differently. Justifying your actions with facts is effective in the short term, but it won’t resolve the issue; blockers keep blocking until there is no benefit to doing so. A more effective approach is to demonstrate how your work will help them out.

Understanding their issue and how they believe the change you are working on will harm them is the first step in neutralizing the blocker. Next, demonstrate how your work will benefit them. If it doesn’t, demonstrate how alternative approaches will harm them more. Finally, make any adjustments (that won’t compromise your objective) to get them on your side, or at least to not block your success. 


KNOWLEDGE BITES




ALIGNMENT SCRIPT TOOL:  How will I neutralize a blocker?


Opening: 
________________________________________________________________________

Issue: 
________________________________________________________________________

Alignment of Outcomes: ________________________________________________________________________

Confirm Support: ________________________________________________________________________

Closing: 
________________________________________________________________________


SUCCESS TIP

Saying “thank you” as you leave reinforces the commitment you’ve made with each other and demonstrates your appreciation for that commitment.


For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the Overcoming a Blocker podcast episode with HR and change management expert Dr. Jamie Gruman.

Phil Buckley is the author of Change on the Run and  Change with Confidence, host of the  Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the  Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #resistance #podcasts 

Saturday, 28 May 2022

How to Close a Change Project

 

This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.

DO THIS

Define the closing date as the first time you can accurately measure benefits.


BY DOING THIS

–        Start Gain agreement from leaders that the project closes after benefits are measured.

–       Set the closing date with leaders and add it to the project plan (and leaders' calendars).

–       Develop a work back plan to ensure sufficient transition and measurement activities are in place.


Managing the close of a change project is challenging because most leaders and project team members have mentally moved on to their next roles and challenges.

Defining the close date as the point in time when benefits are first measured reduces the risk of the final tasks being rushed or missed. It also broadens the project and operating teams' focus to include realizing the change benefits.

Adding the closing date to the project plan necessitates a work back schedule including benefit tracking and recording activities. This work may extend some project team members' participation and uncover additional insights and lessons to guide future transformations.


KNOWLEDGE BITES




BENEFITS MEASUREMENT TOOL: What benefits will be realized by the project close date?


SUCCESS TIP

Identifying the absence of benefit measurement as a risk in the planning phase increases the likelihood of leaders supporting an extended close date.

For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the Closing a Change Project  podcast episode with HR and change management expert Tim Creasey.

Phil Buckley is the author of Change on the Run and  Change with Confidence, host of the  Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the  Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #sustainment #podcasts 

How to Identify Your Lessons Learned

 

This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.

DO THIS

Keep a daily project journal.


BY DOING THIS

–        Start a journal on day one of your role in the change initiative.

–       Note everything—both positive and negative—as events occur.

–       Review highlights when the project is complete.


Experience is the best teacher, which enables us to repeat success patterns and eliminate future roadblocks to achieve our goals. Understanding how experiences impact outcomes helps build change capacity and skill and dramatically improves organizational knowledge on how projects work within our cultures.

Learning occurs in the moment—something worked or didn’t work because of specific factors, and we often lose the learnings we don’t record quickly. This is especially true in the middle of projects because we tend to remember only beginnings and endings, leaving the key middle ground foggy. Documenting the context and details of your observations while they are fresh in your mind gives you the best learning. Keeping a daily log, either paper or electronic, enables you to create an accurate and fulsome learning summary at the end of the project. The details you record daily will enhance the stories you tell about what you did, how you did it and what you learned from the results.


KNOWLEDGE BITES




LESSONS LEARNED JOURNALING TOOL: What have I learned from my role on this change project?

What worked well that I would want to repeat?

____________________________________________________________________

What didn’t work well that I wouldn’t?

____________________________________________________________________

What surprised me?

______________________________________________________________

SUCCESS TIP

Lessons are best communicated when you illustrate them with stories.

For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the  Identifying Your Lessons Learned podcast episode with HR and change management expert Kathy Repa.

Phil Buckley is the author of  Change on the Run and  Change with Confidence, host of the Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the  Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #lessonslearned #podcasts            

Thursday, 14 April 2022

How to Make Decisions


This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.

DO THIS

Choose the best option that leaders support.


BY DOING THIS

–        Assess the pros and cons of three options.

–       Select the one that delivers the best outcomes.

–        Discuss your choice with leaders and make adjustments if required to gain united support.

Your most important change activity is to help leaders make decisions. Showing them the implications of their options will lead to better and more supported choices. Often, decisions must be made quickly, either because there is little time to discuss new information or something has gone wrong. Listing pros and cons is a fast way to review options in the context of your objectives. Identify three options and note the pros and cons of each. Doing nothing may be a good option to assess because it evaluates the speed of action. Choose the option that best moves you toward achieving your goals. 

Once you’ve identified the best option, share it with leaders and implement it if you have their support. If not, make modifications until all leaders support it. Sometimes, you’ll need to pivot to another option if they reject your first pick. If this happens, try to build in some elements of your best option to increase the probability of its success. 


KNOWLEDGE BITES


DECISION COMPARISON TOOL: How will I make a decision?

SUCCESS TIP

Informally (verbally) test your best option with key leaders. You can then incorporate their feedback before formally presenting.

For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the Decision Making podcast episode with board member, breakthrough consultant and executive and team coach Stephanie Wilkes.

Phil Buckley is the author of Change on the Run and Change with Confidence, host of the Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #decisionmaking #podcasts

Friday, 25 March 2022

How to Reward Team Members

 

This post's podcast episode is available at SounderApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcher and Spotify.

When you are short of time, here is the one action that will give you 80 percent results in 20 percent of the time.

DO THIS

Recognize people’s efforts through small gifts.


BY DOING THIS

–        Identify milestones to recognize with gifts

–        Ask leaders to present the gifts at team meetings, highlighting the efforts that led to the achievements

–         Profile the next milestone’s tasks and express confidence they’ll be achieved


People have a need to be recognized for work that is meaningful and necessary for success. From recognition to gifts, rewards play an important role in maintaining morale, focus, and performance. They acknowledge people’s hard work and give them confidence in their future contributions.

Celebrating accomplishments with peers is especially effective because everyone knows how difficult the tasks were to achieve. Small gifts have symbolic value because they’re tangible reminders of the achievement and the organization’s appreciation for it. They also help the leader write a narrative about people’s efforts and their impact on success, positioning team members as protagonists rising to the challenge who will do so again in the future.

Being specific about how a person or team accomplished the task personalizes the recognition, making it more meaningful, especially when shared with friends and family (“My boss said that I saved the day.”)

Rewards that can be shared and enjoyed outside of work, like movie tickets or leaving early on a Friday, have the greatest impact. They communicate that people’s personal lives are important and haven't been forgotten by leaders.  


KNOWLEDGE BITES


REWARDS PLANNING TOOL: What rewards will I give my project team?


SUCCESS TIP

Taking photos of the recognition ceremonies and sharing them broadly and visibly supercharge their meaning and impact.


For more stories, insights and advice, listen to the Rewarding Team Members podcast episode with CFO/COO and change leader Matt Lloyd.

Phil Buckley is the author of Change on the Run and Change with Confidence, host of the Change on the Run Podcast, and co-creator of the Sharing Change with Confidence Newsletter.

#change #changemanagement #transformation #leadership #projectmanagement #culture #podcasts